Browsing All posts tagged under »gcc«

Debugging the STM32-P152 board with GDB

September 15, 2013


This post shows how to debug a program running on the Olimex STM32-P152. The setup consists of free software such as GCC, GDB and OpenOCD, and FTDI USB cables.

Flashing the STM32-P152 board with OpenOCD

August 14, 2013


This post shows how to write the embedded flash of the Olimex STM32-P152 board with a custom program, using free software and FTDI USB cables.

ARM926 interrupts in QEMU

April 15, 2012


In this post I prepared what I think is the simplest example on how to manage interrupts for the widespread ARM926 core. From this example one can expand the complexity of the interrupt management at will. I’m going to test the functionality with QEMU, emulating the Versatile Platform Baseboard. I based this example on my […]

Compile Linux kernel 3.2 for ARM and emulate with QEMU

March 31, 2012


This is a tutorial to: 1. Get Linux kernel 3.2 source code 3. Configure and compile for Versatile Express ARM Cortex-A9 platform 4. Prepare and create a ramdisk using initramfs schema 5. Emulate kernel boot and ramdisk execution using QEMU

Linking a binary blob with GCC

February 19, 2012


There’s a simple way to include binary data inside an executable, when using a GCC toolchain. The trick relies on using objcopy to transform the binary blob of data into an object file that can be linked. In this example I am creating a binary blob of 16 bytes of random data in file “blob.bin“: […]

Codesourcery toolchains have new site at Mentor Graphics

October 8, 2011


This completely slipped under my radar: Mentor Graphics acquired CodeSourcery’s toolchain products some time ago. I found out when I got to their site and it redirected me to Mentor. In my tutorials I often make use of the Lite editions of the Codesourcery toolchains, so this is the new site for reference: Sourcery CodeBench […]

Using CodeSourcery bare metal toolchain for Cortex-M3

September 3, 2011


Using the CodeSourcery arm-none-eabi toolchain to compile a minimal "Hello World" example for Stellaris lm3s6965 microcontroller. The microcontroller is emulated through QEMU and the output is written to a serial port.